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About MBP®

The mechanism of bone regeneration

Two types of cells are active in the work of bone generation: osteoblasts and osteoclasts.
These cells keep busy by creating new bone material little by little, day after day.

Why do bones regenerate?

Bones continue to regenerate long after we reach our full height. Even when we become adults, bones continue to regenerate every three years. There are two reasons for this phenomenon.

First, bones supply tissues throughout our bodies with calcium, serving a vital role in keeping us alive and healthy.
Bones function as storehouses for calcium, providing our bodies with calcium whenever there is a shortage and storing calcium when there is a surplus.
In short, bones are constantly regenerated through the constant release and storage of calcium.

Second, bones regenerate to replace old bones. Even strong bones lose their resilience and become fragile as they grow old. Regeneration ensures that bones remain strong and flexible.

Why do bones regenerate?

The function of osteoblast cells

Osteoblasts are cells that build bones.
They produce collagen, the reinforcing rods of bones, then coat the collagen with a protein "glue" that holds the calcium in place.
Calcium from the bloodstream then automatically adheres to the collagen, forming new bone material.

The function of osteoclast cells

Osteoclasts are cells that dissolve bones.
They start out as a type of blood cell, but are transformed into osteoclasts within our bones through the action of hormones.
Osteoclast cells use acids or enzymes to dissolve the calcium and collagen from old bones. This dissolved calcium then reenters the bloodstream and is carried to different parts of the body.

But sometimes osteoclasts dissolve more calcium than is actually required-such as when the body's hormonal balance is disrupted. This sort of imbalance is especially pronounced in women during menopause.

The main causes of osteoporosis are said to be calcium deficiency and the damage caused by overactive osteoclast cells. Suppressing the excessive activity of osteoclasts is therefore of vital importance.

Bone regeneration

Bone regeneration

Bone structure by age

Growth period Time to jump-start bone development!

Growth period Time to jump-start bone development!

Increased metabolism during the growth period means that bones are rapidly being formed and dissolved. But because bone formation is more pronounced at this stage, the body continues to grow larger. During this period, food and exercise are vital to growth. Bone mass is said to increase until approximately age 20 in the backbone, and until age 30 in the arms and legs.

Growth period Time to jump-start bone development!

Maturity period Preparing for the future with strong bones

Maturity period Preparing for the future with strong bones

By the time we reach our 30s, our bodies are fully grown and our bone mass peaks. It is a period when bone formation and bone destruction are in balance. At this time of life, a balanced diet is important to delay the onset of a future decrease in bone mass.

Maturity period Preparing for the future with strong bones

Aging Protecting your bones from osteoporosis

Aging Protecting your bones from osteoporosis

From the 40s onwards, bone mass enters a gradual decline. While both bone formation and destruction become weaker during this period, bone destruction overtakes bone formation. And when this situation progresses to a dangerous level, osteoporosis sets in. It is therefore extremely important to delay the onset of bone mass reduction as much as possible.

Aging Protecting your bones from osteoporosis
Why is osteoporosis common among women?
One reason osteoporosis is so common among women is that women have smaller bone structures and a lower total bone mass than men.
Another reason is the major influence exerted by the female hormone estrogen.

Estrogen works to inhibit the bone-destroying function of osteoclast cells, but with the onset of menopause, estrogen excretion ceases almost completely. This results in more intense activity by osteoclasts, which leads to increased bone destruction and osteoporosis.
It is anticipated that MBP® will control the excessive activity of osteoclast cells.
Why is osteoporosis common among women?

MBP® is a registered trademark of MEGMILK SNOW BRAND Co., Ltd. in Japan.
It is the translated version of a website which originally created for use in Japan.

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